Competent

Jordan PetersonJordan Peterson is having “a moment”. A widely circulated interview brought his considerable platform into the spotlight with a variety of articles including this David Brooks piece which summarizes things nicely.

In the aforementioned interview, he uses a word I hadn’t fully considered: Competent.

“Competency is power”

I bounced that idea off my kids around the dinner table last night. I do want them to marry someone who is competent. Competent at cleaning the kitchen, competent at raising children, competent at balancing a checkbook, competent at managing conflict in a healthy way, competent at managing the many problems life brings.

When my wife and I started dating, my roommate and I were not competent at lots of things, not the least of which was cleaning. We once went an entire year without cleaning the kitchen. Don’t ask. The bathroom was worse, so it took most of the attention away from the kitchen. People would just leave rather then use the bathroom.

We aren’t born competent. We have to learn, and most learning comes from Someone who already knows how to do it.

It’s ok if we aren’t competent in our personal finances yet. It’s not ok for us to stay that way. We, our (future) spouse, our business partners, our children, and our parents deserve better. Have you ever had a friend (usually when you were younger) that always was asking to borrow money? It’s hard to be friends with that guy.

It’s important to develop competencies at:

No judgement. I doesn’t matter when we find ourselves today. I’m much better at cleaning my kitchen these days. Let’s pick one area, talk to someone who knows that area, and start making small actions.

You and I have the capacity to be financially competent.

Extra Income in 2018

1000 extra in 2018Creating a little extra margin in our financial lives will radically change our relationship with money. Saving or earning an extra $1,000 would make a big difference in all of our lives. We can do it in 2018.

A spark of Hope let’s us Believe it’s possible. A little Belief starts our brains looking for Opportunities. An Opportunity seized creates an Action. Action leads to the physical changing of our circumstances.

Changing our physical conditions is “work” in all its forms. The work of creating order from chaos. “All hard work brings a profit, but mere talk leads only to poverty.

Here is an article link to get your brain working and create some hope. Hope in this case being the persistent belief that its possible to change our physical circumstances through “work”.

ARTICLE LINK: 101 Ways to Make $1,000

 

REMINDER: INCOME VS EXPENSES

money tree

When I counsel people (including myself) on how to make their budgets work, I often find that they are much better at EITHER controlling spending OR earning money.

As a reminder, there are two sides to each budget/balance sheet:

INCOME

and

OUTGO (expenses)

The old cliché is that we tend to be ‘savers’ or ‘spenders’. While that is often true, it is very difficult to win with money if you a thrifty saver but don’t earn enough money. Likewise, no matter what my income is I can always find a way to outspend it.

To make a budget/balance sheet work, we need to earn enough AND spend it wisely. The majority of people that volunteer to come talk to me about their money (grad students), tend to be thrifty savers but are having a hard time making ends meet without going into debt – something they don’t want to do.

For them, they don’t have a saving/investing type problem. Instead, we have to put our heads together on how they can earn more money. That can be challenging with the time constraints of school and family. It also isn’t a quick fix – there isn’t one change to be made.

The good news is that there are lots of options. Earning more money is a skill that can be built. The reality is that someone that has earned more in the past is significantly more likely to earn more in the future. Why?

It may be that they are more apt to recognize financial opportunity, how to leverage their skills in the marketplace, how to ‘sell’ themselves as a bargain to potential employers, or how to provide and communicate their value.

More on that:

https://graduatefree.com/2015/01/20/part-time-jobs/

https://graduatefree.com/2016/11/17/how-to-get-paid/

https://graduatefree.com/2016/12/07/how-to-reset-your-life/

Step one to any change is making a decision. If we decide we need to make more money to make our budget work, we will begin to look for and see opportunities. Prayer is a powerful tool in this. God can open the eyes of our mind.

Alternative path to wealth

Dollar signLast week I teased that aside from hoping to strike it rich with a miracle investment, there was a better route to go. Here is my brilliant three-step plan:

One: Earn More

Dave Ramsey teaches that your most important wealth building tool is your income. To build wealth, you need to generate income. Saving money (income minus expenses) and investing (return on saved money) are impossible without generating income. Obviously more income increases your chances (but certainly doesn’t guarantee) of having a surplus. If we aren’t currently generating a surplus, we need to either (or both) cut expenses and/or generate more income. Here is some advice on generating more income.

Two: Get rid of Debt

Getting out of debt accomplishes two super important things. First, you take over control of your income. Debt is a lien against your future income. Take control of your future income – it will allow you to save which is step one in accumulate wealth. Second, if you are paying interest on debt, you can have a guaranteed return on an investment by keeping that interest for yourself. See this.

Three: Save cash

This seems counter intuitive, but having a large cash reserve is valuable for several reasons. First, you can negotiate significant discounts on things you are forced to buy. Second, you are prepared when assets that we know and understand become significantly discounted. Like when we get our next recession.  There is a lot more to be said about the advantages of liquidity, but I recommend trying it to see how it feels.

 

Concession from last week. While I’m steadfast that we should let go of the myth of being a great investor, it’s really important to understand that yielding a couple of extra percent yields a massive difference in returns over time. Over 20 years, the difference between earning 6% and 12% on an investment isn’t 2x the return, it’s 3x. This goes up even more over time and/or return.

TOOLS

hand-sawI have a friend who works in the construction trade. He confessed that sometimes he puts off or just forgets to make his truck payment for a month or two. He always catches up and pays it back current, it’s just hard to keep track of all of his bills and pay them on time. Now he was worried his low credit score wouldn’t let him expand or buy a house in the future.

I know this friend is really skilled at his job. I also know he is meticulous about cleaning his tools at the end of the day. Why I asked him? Because, he told me, “If you take care of your tools they will take care of you.”

These are the wise words of a skilled craftsman.

The following word picture occurred to me and we talked through it:

One of the many reasons we all work and is to secure our unknown financial future. Good credit is a symptom of someone that takes care of their personal business. I want you to think of your credit as a tool in the toolbox of your financial future. Take care of this tool with the same diligence you bring to your physical tools.

Sometimes it’s hard for us to think and work outside the area of our expertise. If we’re working long hours, in graduate school writing papers into the night, feeding and changing small children, or feeling the weight of ministry demands it can be difficult to remember the importance of the other ‘tools’ in our life.

Our physical body might be our most important tool. We can’t do anything without it. Let’s take care of that tool. Everyday.

Success in life is impossible without healthy relationships – to God and others. Is there some rust building there?

When Noelle and I were really motivated to get out of debt, we spent a few minutes each day thinking and taking a small action. We understood that meeting this financial goal would be a valuable tool that would enable us to be able to do ministry, provide a stable home for our children, and be generous givers.

Take care of your tools and they will take care of you.

How to Reset your Life

redditThis reddit thread came to my attention yesterday and it is fascinating. If you scan through the original post there are some good comments. In my judgement from reading, research, and exemplified by one person’s experiences on this thread, here is my formula for resetting your financial life:

  • Cut expenses to nothing

Dave Ramsey has said he can tell by the tone of callers voices if they are ready to change. It’s the “sick and tired of being sick and tired”. He calls it “Selling so much stuff the dog thinks its next”. Like the reddit poster, I need to be willing to cut cable, internet, eating out, Netflix, move residences, and anything else that is preventing me from paying off debt and building an emergency fund.

  • Create a plan for more income

There seems to be some direct connection between getting dramatically serious about cutting expenses and creating an income plan. Perhaps not having any entertainment options creates space in my life for more work and time to think about my work. How am I going to create more income? When I take the time to focus my will, my brain starts finding solutions to the problem. Praying is also deeply powerful. Prayer aligns my will with Gods. The Bible says we were “created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.” The Psalmist says God’s direct favor can be seen by “establishing the work of our hands”.  Pray that God would reveal opportunities for us to “work as unto the Lord”. In my experience the most common way these opportunities are revealed is by working on what is available to me right now. “All hard work brings a profit, but mere talk leads only to poverty.”

That’s the formula. It may be simple but it isn’t easy. I have a note in my office from Tony Robbins. If you want to change your life:

  • Decide what you want
  • Take MASSIVE action
  • Review results & make course corrections
  • Repeat steps 2 & 3

Two Causes of Poverty

powell-poverty-quoteWhat causes poverty? Thinking about this question can teach us a lot about how to create personal economic mobility. Those are big words for get out of debt, build an emergency fund, save for retirement, and create stability for our children.

In my post-election reading, I came across this long interview (actually made and posted before the election).  The author makes a case that endemic poverty is caused by two main factors:

  • Social Structures That Harm. These are cultural forces that are weighted against the poor and against upward mobility. These aren’t unique to our society, the author of Proverbs 22 points out as a matter of fact that the “The poor are always ruled over by the rich.” In the past I have used the term “Risks” to bring personal awareness to some of these structures. Examples of these cultural forces include redlining neighborhoods, the town factory closing, poor educational systems, payday lenders, having bad parents, and corrupt governments. You might call these “Things that happen to you.”
  • Personal Choices. The interviewee calls this “helping people make better moral choices.” This is the personal responsibility that is required to change your life. Proverbs also address this in a number of says such as “Wealth from get-rich-quick schemes quickly disappears; wealth from hard work grows over time.” Examples of “Things you do to yourself” include substance abuse, not living on a budget, spending on wants vs needs, not deferring gratification, a poor work ethic, and having a negative attitude.

Here are two personal questions to ponder:

Do my thoughts and beliefs lean one way or the other?

One of the points the interview makes is that Liberal leaning folks tend to over-emphasize the social structures and those that bend Conservative tend to over-emphasize the personal responsibility.* This makes me think that you and I probably overemphasize one side or the other in our thinking and beliefs:

Do I think poor people are lazy? Do I believe it’s impossible to get out of debt in today’s society? Do I tell people that there aren’t any good jobs out there? Do I complain about my lack of money while wearing these sick new Jordans? Do I define my employability by the time I was laid off? Do I believe that employer really isn’t looking for someone of my age, sex, or color?

The biases and beliefs I carry will dramatically affect my ability to change my story.

Where is my personal greatest return on investment?

If you are called to change the social structures, I encourage you to go for it. I believe these are evil institutions of oppression and that Jesus was directly addressing these when he said the Kingdom of Heaven is advancing and the “Gates of Hell” won’t prevent good from eventually breaking these down.

However, practically for us today complaining and worrying about these cultural forces isn’t helpful. To personally change, we need to First recognize the cultural forces so I can artfully navigate around those to the best of my ability and Second accept the moral responsibility for that which God has entrusted me, managing my life.

———————————–

*Footnote:  An interesting side note on this I heard this week. The fundamental difference between a liberal and conservative world view is the condition of mankind. A liberal worldview leans humanist, meaning that given the right circumstances humans will move toward goodness. A conservative worldview lends itself toward humans in their nature doing the wrong things.

As I understand it, the Biblical worldview is more centric, that humans are created good and to do good (“In the image of God”) but that because we are infected with the virus of sin we will inevitably do what we don’t want to do (Romans 7:15-20).

How to get Paid

$2 bill logoSome students I counsel are skeptical when I advise them that they can and should be earning more money.

If you want to earn more money, it is helpful to understand how and why employers pay employees. Understanding this will dramatically improve your earning power. Here are three main ways employees are compensated:

1.) Hourly. This is the most common and first (and usually only) way most of my students think about being paid. When I tell them they can easily earn $25+ an hour they say “Nobody is paying that.” Correction: (Almost) Nobody pays that per hour. Hourly work is the lowest common denominator – we all have an hour. It’s not based on skill or productivity. There’s nothing wrong with being paid hourly, just understand that both your hours and the dollar per hour the employer can justify are limited.

2.) Piece Work. Many jobs pay by the job, not by the hour. For example, you may be paid $100 to clean a house that should take 5 hours. That’s $20 an hour work. If you can do it in 4 hours, you just received a 25% pay raise. If you’re looking for part time work, finding work that pays by the job instead of the hour is a great way to dramatically boost your income.

3.) Value Added. The highest paying jobs pay by the amount of value you can add. A simple version of this is someone who works on commission. If I sell 3 cars instead of 1 car on a Tuesday, my hourly income is 3x higher. The employer is happy to pay me because they are earning more money. I have ‘added more value’ then I cost my employer. More jobs than you think use this model. It’s “knowing where to hit”. This is why Zig taught “You will get all you want in life, if you help enough other people get what they want.

There are lots of other ways to make money (buying and selling stuff, investing, etc.), but those are three models employers use in determining what compensation structure to offer.

Here are some random thoughts on these compensation plans:

  • Pastors should insist on positioning themselves as ‘Piece Work’ and ‘Value Add’, never on hourly. Your Sunday sermon is ‘Piece Work’. It needs to be ready to go by Sunday at 8am. If you can train and discipline yourself to prepare it in 10 hours instead of 20, you should then go home to raise your kids, play golf, or spend time in spiritual renewal. The reality is that being able to prepare it in 10 hours instead of 20 is a unique value you bring, and you need to capture that value for yourself. If you raise a healthier family, the church will benefit from that so the value is mutually beneficial. This isn’t just true of sermon prep, it’s also true of staff meetings, budget committees, dealing with people who complain, etc.
  • When it comes to adding value, there is a huge mark up. Pastors that are educated, good leaders, and have excellent communication skills are going to command a significant premium. Rick Warren has sold over 25 million books, and while he has been blessed with lots of skills, gifts, and opportunities from his maker, he isn’t lucky. The same is true for a local electrician like my friend Tim. Tim is compensated far more than many others in his field because being honest and dependable has a huge premium in his field.
  • The great news is that the ways you can add value are truly limitless. Find the areas that have the highest return on your time. It might be recruiting new kids to the youth group. It might be solving problems without requiring direction. Studies show that food servers that use their name and smile can earn $2.00 more per tip.
  • Part time income is really well suited for piece work and value add. If you worked in retail you might make $10 an hour. 10 hours a week would be $100. But you could make several times that if you were a piano teacher or math tutor charging $40 an hour. It would require you to put together flyers and facebook posts to spread the word. The actual time you spend teaching piano is somewhat valuable, but the time you spend finding new clients is extremely valuable. Finding new clients will pay you $100-$200 an hour. No matter what job you have, figure out what part of that job is the most valuable and do it more.
  • To truly understand value, we need to understand the stories people tell themselves. Teaching little Suzy the piano probably isn’t the highest value you bring. As a parent I want to believe that I am opening up the world of music to my kids. Broadening their horizons and teaching them the arts. The REAL value you bring isn’t teaching the piano its confirming my story to myself that I’m a good parent.
  • You don’t need to be self-employed for this to work. If I cleaned houses, I might go to my boss and ask “What’s the value of a new customer?” If they hired our company once a month for an average of three years and the company made a profit of $100 each visit a new customer would be worth $3,600 to the company. Would the company pay me $500 to find them a new customer? Of course. Then I would put up flyers on the bulletin board at church, let friends know I was looking for new customers. I may have started as a house keeper, but now I have a side hustle.
  • Most people that don’t believe they can make a lot more money don’t understand where they can add true value. A piano teacher is somewhat valuable. But if the teacher asks for referrals every week at the end of the lesson, that 1-2 minutes is worth hundreds of dollars per hour.
  • If you have the capacity for 10 students and you have 15 willing to take lessons, you can raise your rate from $40 to $50 (or $20-$35 or $55-$65). You will lose a couple students, but still have 10 willing to pay the extra. You didn’t earn a 25% raise for being a great teacher (though you may and should be), you earned that by finding more clients. No matter what job or field, figure out where the value is added to the organization.
  • I’m not convinced driving for Uber or Lyft is a good job. It wears out my car (my factory), my income is limited by the hours I can work, and there are very few ways I can add additional value.
  • I watched “The Big Short” last night and was reminded that nobody understands “Value Add” like financial professionals. Hedge fund managers build it right into their agreements (2 and 20) so there isn’t any ambiguity when it comes time to get paid.
  • Perhaps the most important skill you can build is learning how to explain to the client what exactly is the value you add and why that is important and worth it to them.
  • The heart of all jobs is solving a problem. The highest paid people are able to communicate “I understand your problem” and “I can help you”. It’s really empathy. That will get you the job, following through and delivering on and above your promise will keep the job or keep the customer coming back.

Skye Jethani on CALLING

skyeA biblical theology of work is critical to understand why you’re going into ministry vs the work place. One of the most important perspectives I’ve read on this is Skye Jethani’s explanation of a Christian’s three callings. You can find all his writings here:

www.skyejethani.com

and this particular post here:

http://skyejethani.com/calling-all-christians/

I’ve re-posted it fully here because of it’s relevance and importance. Enjoy:

For years I served as a teaching pastor at my church, but then left the pastoral team to pursue a calling outside the institutional church. For the first time since graduating from seminary, I found myself in the pews more often than in the pulpit. It changed my perspective. Working as a writer and editor, traveling more often, and juggling a young family left very little discretionary time in my schedule. There was simply no way I could participate in everything the church was asking me to do while also fulfilling the calling God had given me to pursue outside the church.

Within a few months, I understood how most of my congregation felt. And I realized how insensitive and guilt-inducing many of my past sermons had been. In sermon after sermon I had called them to give more time, more money, more energy to the work of the church. Little did I understand or affirm their callings in the world.

I had inadvertently created a secular/sacred divide in which the “sacred” calling of the church was pitted against their “secular” callings in the world. I never said this explicitly, of course, but it was implied.

Later I was invited to preach again. This time my message included an apology for my failure to understand the value of their work outside the church. The sermon was met with shouts of “Amen!”—not a common occurrence in our predominantly Anglo suburban congregation. Why did it take me so long to see my error, and why did I have to leave pastoral ministry to recognize it? Part of the problem is history.

Centuries ago the word vocation, meaning literally “a calling,” applied only to bishops, priests, and monks—those occupying offices within the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church. It was believed that the clergy had been called by God. They alone had a vocation while everyone else merely worked.

The idea dates back to Eusebius, the bishop of Caesarea in the fourth century. He wrote that Christ had established two ways of life, the “perfect life” and the “permitted life.” The perfect life was the one God called the clergy to—a life of prayer, worship, and service to Christ through the church. Other occupations, while necessary, carried less dignity. The labor of farmers, artists, merchants, and homemakers was not evil, but neither was it blessed, nor were these roles callings from God. After all, they were concerned with the things of earth, while the clergy were occupied with the things of heaven.

This hierarchy of labor went largely unchallenged until the Protestant Reformation. Leaders like Martin Luther and John Calvin called Christians back to the authority of Scripture, and there they found no justification for the exaltation of the clergy or the abasement of other labor. They read in the New Testament that everyone should work and do “something with their own hands, that they may have something to share with those in need” (Eph. 4:28). This was more than a rebuke of laziness; it was an affirmation of work, including physical labor, as a way of blessing others and manifesting Christian love. The Reformers also recognized that worship of God was not limited to one’s time in a cathedral. God received glory in the ordinary activities of life, including work.

Luther wrote: “The works of monks and priests, however holy and arduous they be, do not differ one whit in the sight of God from the works of the rustic laborer in the field or the woman going about her household tasks, but that all works are measured before God by faith alone.”

With this recalibration of the doctrine of vocation, many came to view their labor differently, not as menial labor to be endured but as a God-ordained calling to be pursued with religious zeal. It resulted in a new devotion to work that historians refer to as “the Protestant work ethic,” and it was coupled with a vision that Christ was actively engaged in every part of the world—not just the church.

This new understanding meant things suddenly mattered that the church had long ago abandoned. Commerce, agriculture, government, and the home became honored and even holy arenas in which to serve God. And a person determined where to serve the same way clergy did—by listening for Christ’s call upon his life.

Later the Puritans gave added nuance and dimension to this theology of vocation. There are three levels of calling:

First, a Christian’s highest calling is to abide in communion with Christ.

Second, all Christians also share a set of common callings. These are the many commands of Scripture that apply to all of God’s children in every time and place. These include instructions to love one another, pray for those who persecute you, forgive those who wrong you, give to those in need, honor your father and mother, do not steal, do not covet, do not commit adultery, be prepared to share about your hope in Christ, and hundreds of other commands.

Third, each Christian will also have a specific calling that God directs him or her to accomplish.

The second level, our common callings, are what most churches focus upon today. The reason is simple—common callings are easy to discover. One simply opens the Bible and reads them. Having read Ephesians, Pastor Brian can stand before his congregation on Sunday with divine authority and say, “Husbands, love your wives.” This is the common calling of all married Christians, but Pastor Brian cannot cite chapter and verse to proclaim a specific calling, like, “Sally, go to law school.”

A specific calling, which is what we often mean when we use the word vocation, requires Sally to live in communion with God and discern his call directly. While her specific calling may be blessed and confirmed by members of her community, as Paul and Barnabas experienced in Acts 13, it cannot be discovered without the illuminating role of God’s Spirit in her life.

Herein lies the problem. In many of our Christian communities, we may affirm the Spirit as a doctrinal truth, but the reality of his presence is often ignored.

As a result Christians are not equipped to engage either their highest calling (communion with God), or discern their specific calling (vocation). What remains is the one thing the church can access without the Spirit’s presence—Scripture.

While God-given and certainly good, our common callings as captured in the Bible constitute only one facet of our Christian life, and without the presence of the Spirit, we remain powerless to follow these commands as well.

For this reason if Christians do not grasp their highest calling to live in vibrant, continual communion with God through the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit, then neither our common nor specific callings can be properly engaged. If we get our highest calling right, however, and welcome the reality of the Spirit into our lives, then in most cases the other dimensions of our calling take care of themselves.

By neglecting the doctrines of our highest and specific callings, the contemporary church has also found itself employing a leadership model that looks more like a corporation in which a centralized organization determines everyone’s role. Drawn by the efficiency and success of corporations, many pastors have been told to think of themselves as CEOs. They articulate a mission, set goals, rally people and resources, and align them all to accomplish a single task.

In this model the senior leader is the individual hearing from God, and the work of the institutional church is what ultimately gets all the attention. Whether a person is a nurse, farmer, architect, or shopkeeper is irrelevant, as long as she or he is supporting the church’s vision with finances and volunteer time. A person’s value, in this model, is determined by how closely she or he aligns with the institutional church’s vision.

Often the mission articulated in this model is rooted in Scripture and part of our common calling, such as the call to “make disciples” or to “serve the least of these.” Who would disagree with the importance of these works?

Still, when these callings are untethered from our highest call (commune with God) or the specific call Christ has given to each of his followers, it can do great damage. When this happens the institutional church’s work soon becomes all-consuming and many Christians develop a suspicion that the church’s leaders really care only about advancing their institution’s agenda. They begin to feel like the church is using them rather than loving them.

Resistance to the sacred/secular divide and to the expectation that one’s first commitment should be to the institutional church is especially evident among the younger adults I have engaged. While earlier generations may have valued the idea of surrendering their lives and fortunes to an institution, the young today do not. In fact, they are increasingly suspicious of large organizations. According to Gallup, forty years ago 68 percent of Americans reported having a strong or high confidence in the church. Today it is down to 44 percent, and among the young it is even lower.

This generation’s lack of response to the institutional church’s call has left many pastors flummoxed. They mistakenly believe it is a matter of style. “If we just change our music, add some candles, and turn up the ‘cool’ factor, more young people will engage,” they assume. Others blame it on immaturity. One pastor asked me, “How do I get a generation that doesn’t believe in commitment to commit to the church?” Maybe the problem is the object of the commitment.

I do not believe the problem is style or immaturity; it is a church that has lost a theology of vocation. We fail to see beyond our common callings to either the believer’s highest call (God) or specific call (vocation).

Younger people today, perhaps more than previous generations, have a strong sense of their specific calling. They believe God has called them into business, the arts, government, the household, education, the media, the social sector, or health care, and they are often very committed to these venues of cultural engagement. But when their specific callings are never acknowledged by the church, and instead only our common callings or the goal of the institutional church is extolled, the young feel like something important is missing.

Rather than embracing the fullness of the Christian life comprising multiple facets—highest, common, and specific callings—the church unknowingly communicates that following Christ is a tension between sacred callings and secular work. Often the message is: “You must sacrifice your specific, secular calling to do more of the sacred work that’s important to the institutional church,” this guilt-laden message is one a young, jaded generation is much less likely to tolerate. It is seen as a self-serving power play by church leaders even if, like me, they never intended it to be. The ancient error of Eusebius is alive and well in the evangelical church today.

Does this mean the institutional church should stop emphasizing our common callings or its evangelistic work? Absolutely not! Rather, it is vital that the church rediscover the God-given dignity of all callings and how they fit together.

It is not the pastor’s task to wrestle more people away from “secular” engagements in order to help him accomplish his “sacred” work, but to erase these categories in the lives of those he leads in order that Christ might come to reign over all parts of their lives and world.

Echoing the Protestant reformers and the Puritans, Dallas Willard recognizes the danger of dividing our work into departments and the destructive illusion it fosters. He says: “There truly is no division between sacred and secular except what we have created. And that is why the division of the legitimate roles and functions of human life into the sacred and secular does incalculable damage to our individual lives and the cause of Christ. Holy people must stop going into ‘church work’ as their natural course of action and take up holy orders in farming, industry, law, education, banking, and journalism with the same zeal previously given to evangelism or to pastoral and missionary work.”

If we are to embrace this united view then we must advance a new vision for Christian engagement in the world, employ a new model of leadership, and create a new spirit of affirmation that values each person’s specific, Christ-given call within our churches.

That is what I set out to accomplish in my upcoming book, Futureville. Stay tuned for more information about the book and how you can get an advanced copy.

From:  SkyeJethani.com