Non-Owning

20160917_114549There is an old joke that the best two days of boat ownership are the day you buy it and the day you sell it. I spent this last weekend playing 54 holes of golf and hanging with some cool dudes. This picture is me drilling an 8 iron over water to make a key par.

We were blessed that a family member of one of the players has a large vacation home in the mountains and they let us use it for the weekend. As I was sitting in the hot tub that night, I reflected on this thought: Though I’m not a millionaire, for this weekend I was experiencing all the enjoyment of this huge mountain chalet.

For some reason, I am hardwired to think I need to own something to enjoy it. Maybe this is a result of thousands of advertisements or perhaps it’s just my nature to want to control. I do think there is a strong movement toward Lyft, VRBO, community gardens, bike sharing, and more peer-to-peer.

We have a guest bedroom in our house, so for the past few months we’ve had a young person living with us. It hasn’t been a burden, it’s actually made life better. I wonder if this is what the early church believers were hoping for when they “shared all things in common”.

Paul told Timothy to teach the wealthy (most of us) to “be willing to share”. What things can we share with each other? What do you need that perhaps you could get by with just borrowing? If we reorient our thinking around this, I think it would tremendously reduce our overall debt levels.

Student Resources

If it isn’t on your radar, and you are a current student, Denver Seminary has put together a fantastic resources page. Here is some more info and the link:capture

 

Student Life Resources Webpage: www.dsresources.squarespace.com

This web platform allows Student Life to present our buffet of assistive and developmental resources and services (it is different from the Seminary’s main website).  Please use the hyperlink above to navigate to this site, and let me encourage you to bookmark or anchor it in your “favorites” menu so you can access it with one-click.  This site is a significant resource in and of itself, and we are excited that you can now begin using it as you provide students with helpful and timely information. 

Quick Thought

jason dayI taught a small group this morning on “The Long Defeat”. It’s a quote from Tolkien that I came across this week via Wesley’s wonderful essay (which links this from Alan Jacobs) and I think pairs perfectly with this beautiful poem and reflection by Richard Rohr.

One connection I’ll make here: If I’m results driven, bitterness will eventually become the defining characteristic of my life. Instead, I submit the outcome (including the possibility of defeat in my life, my relationships, my projects, my country, all my needs and hopes and dreams) to God and I learn to ‘practice’ living.

This is true of budgeting and raising children. It’s true for world number one Jason Day: “I got addicted to the process of getting better.” It’s equally true for every non-famous person that does their taxes, serves a client, prepares a meal, teaches a child math, or pays off a debt.

Change (Part Two)

grip golfI have been teaching my son to golf over the past few years. Unfortunately he inherited his dad’s aversion to authority so taking direction hasn’t always gone well. Despite the people that want to help him get better, he pushes back. As we have noted, change is hard.

One reason he pushes back: It doesn’t feel right.

The vast majority of golf teachers in the world will tell you that you need to hold the club in your fingers (not palms) with the “V” of your index finger and thumb pointing at your right shoulder. Often Zeke’s grip will get too “weak”, with the “V” pointing at his chin or left shoulder instead of right shoulder.  This is a critical fundamental to hitting the shots he wants to hit, so I’ll reposition his hands on the club and say “Try it this way”.

But he hates it. He says it doesn’t feel comfortable. He won’t be able to hit the ball the way he’s practiced. After I’ve placed his hands on the club the correct way he even re-grips it back to the old way right before he swings.

Of course he’s right. It doesn’t feel natural. It doesn’t feel comfortable. He legitimately doesn’t like it.

But a good golf teaching professional will tell you “what you feel isn’t real”. If you will stick with the change and hit a couple hundred golf balls, the new grip will become your “normal” grip and anything else will start to feel weird. It will become your new normal fundamental.

I don’t need to make the applications to life for you, but I just want to encourage you. If you’re struggling with an area of change – especially around your personal finances – stick with it. It won’t feel comfortable. That’s ok. Trust the process. Hit a couple hundred balls and you’ll look back and not recognize that old crappy golfer.

CHANGE

ODM Logo“Will” has been homeless since he was 12 years old. In the last couple of years he’s made tremendous progress including doing really well at his job. Contrary to what you might assume, housing is usually one of the last pieces of integrating into what you might consider ‘normal’ life. For example, Will got an apartment earlier this year but has continued to sleep outside – Urban Camping – because he feels claustrophobic in the apartment and it’s such a departure and separation from his community and life as he has known it for so long.

That story was told to me last week while visiting Open Door Ministries where I serve on the board. For someone that’s integrated into mainstream society, this story seems impossible to believe. But as I thought about it, I realized how hard I really struggle to make personal change. I’m the same as Will. The reality is, the areas of my life that I’m working on are just less visible and more socially acceptable.

Despite practicing financially healthy habits for years, doing a monthly budget remains one of the biggest challenges for Noelle and me. We have tried any number of different methods, but the busyness of life and lack of urgency causes us to miss self-imposed disciplines that would lead to a healthier life.

Regardless if it’s doing a monthly budget or sleeping under a bridge, change is hard. It takes a tremendous effort to break life-long habits. Let’s do it anyway.

Income Inequality

Rio Opening CeremoniesMy wife loves the Olympics so we’ve been watching a lot of them this week. Yesterday I saw some stunning images like the one on the right accompanying several articles like these.

On a recent Malcolm Gladwell podcast he raised an interesting question about how to solve problems. Is a particular problem a ‘basketball problem’ where teams need to improve the best player or is it a ‘soccer problem’ where improvement comes by improving the worst player?

His point was that some problems have top down solutions and other problems have bottom up solutions.

The image above really provides a stunning portrait of income inequality. When it comes to Income Inequality, almost all the articles talk about it like a ‘basketball problem’. That is they focus on the top .01%. That’s understandable because broke people are always at zero. When the .01% get even more money the Inequality goes up. The reality is that the top 1% of income earners receiving 20% of the pre-tax income is a problem.

But assuming you are not in the 1%, I would suggest that the best use of your and my time is not trying to tear down the 1% but rather work on lifting up from the bottom. Specifically what do I need to do to lift myself and others up from the bottom?

I believe that creating opportunities and paths out of zero is the key. It’s a soccer solution. I can’t lift everyone up, but it’s a lot more impactful to move from destitution to the middle then to move from the middle up or from up to slightly less up.

In today’s world, there are a lot of opportunities, but the traditional paths are no longer clear. Instead, we need to really get creative on how to create and find opportunities to help myself and others into financial stability. I think it starts with a lot of questions:

 

How can I create a financially stable environment to raise my children?

How can I pull one friend out of instability and into financial peace?

How can I create an emergency fund that will take the crisis out of my financial life?

How can I prepare my children for life so they won’t be financially burdened for decades into the future?

How can I help one impoverished person start a business?

How can I avoid and payoff debt?

Do I need to work more or at a different employer?

Are substance abuse issues causing me to stay in poverty?

How can I pay my house off and take back my income?

How would a small business I start create future financial freedom?

If I could earn an extra $500 a month as a freelance employee at night or on the weekends how would that change my life?

If I could cut my lifestyle expenses by $200 a month, what would I do with an extra million dollars in 40 years?

Would something as simple as access to clean water enable a poor person to start working and producing something of value they could sell?

How would personal financial margin create opportunities for myself and others?

What do I need to change to create a path to financial stability?

Do I have a plan?

In what ways to I put a higher value on luxury then on stability?

How do I evaluate needs versus wants?

 

If I am drowning, it’s really difficult to save another drowning person. It takes personal capacity;  savings and extra cash flow to be able to give and be generous. I believe lifting myself out of poverty is step one in helping others do the same and creating greater income equality.

CEO or Physician?

stethoscopeI’m working on a long article. Here is a short excerpt. What do you think is the best metaphor for a local pastor?

There are a couple of occupational metaphors for someone going into a full time ministry career. The rise of the mega church over the past 25 years has led some to equate the lead parson as the “CEO” of the local house of worship. One potential problem of this metaphor is the primary ‘work’ of a faith leader doesn’t have anything to do with that of a CEO. Eugene Peterson says “The pastors of America have metamorphosed into a company of shopkeepers, and the shops they keep are churches. The vocation of pastor has been replaced by the strategies of religious entrepreneurs with business plans.”   A better metaphor might be faith leader as Physician of the Soul. The origin of that saying goes back hundreds of years, probably predating a famous sermon by George Whitefield in the mid 1700s. The phrase is taken from Jesus famous retort to those questioning the company with which he chose to keep “Healthy people don’t need a doctor – sick people do.”

The primary work of a faith leader is to tend to the spiritual health of those in their care. For that reason I really like the analogy of faith leader as a physician of the soul. My proposal is this: The way the medical profession educates physicians is a good example for how we should be educating occupational ministers.

Gladwell on money and higher ed

GladwellMalcolm Gladwell has been an influential thinker for a number of years. I’ve enjoyed several of his books. His new podcast (www.revisionisthistory.com) seems to be taking off. I’m working through the episodes, but the last three (Episodes 4, 5, 6) address education and some of the issues facing it – specifically related to financial issues.

I listened last night to Episode 06 where he addresses philanthropy in higher education. I think its a great listen and if you’re wondering how to influence change – particularly in our context change as it relates to theological education – I think you’ll find it informative.

LINK HERE

 

 

Debt and risk taking – article reflection

AtlanticDoes debt influence risk taking? In this article on Millennial entrepreneurs, that is one of the propositions:

The answer begins with more debt and less risk-taking. The number of student borrowers rose 89 percent between 2004 and 2014, as Lettieri said in his testimony. During that time, the average debt held by student borrowers grew by 77 percent. Even when student debt is bearable, it can still shape a life, nudging young people toward jobs that guarantee a steady salary. Entrepreneurship, however, is a perilous undertaking that doesn’t offer such stability. There is also some evidence that young people’s appetite for risk-taking has declined at the same time that their student debt has grown. More than 40 percent of 25-to-34-year old Americans said a fear of failure kept them from starting a company in 2014; it 2001, just 24 percent said so.

Assuming that hypothesis is true, what risks are required for those going into Occupation Ministry?

Are church planters inherent risk takers? Does a candidate need a willingness to relocate? Do financial constrains restrict a pastors ability to start with a small congregation? Are church staff less likely to stand up to improprieties in leadership if they are financially stressed?

“I ruined my life”

Lives on Hold“Step by step, one law after another has been enacted by Congress to make student debt the worst kind of debt for Americans”

One of the things I informally track is overall attitudes toward borrowing, student loans, and higher education debt. I think this is important, because if there is a ‘bubble’ and the landscape of higher education (and paying for that education) dramatically changes, one of the major reasons will be because of a very public backlash.

We may not have a full fire, but there is a lot of smoke around this subject. The latest example:

http://www.consumerreports.org/student-loan-debt-crisis/lives-on-hold/

That article puts some of the blame on the private collection agencies, but I don’t think that is a real problem or a real solution.

Larry Burkett used to say ‘Debt isn’t a problem, its a symptom of a problem’. Collection agencies aren’t the problem, but a symptom of a larger institutional problem.